Royal Jelly Benefits and Fudge Recipe

Royal jelly may help increase your natural fertility by providing your body with needed nutrients.

This “jelly” is actually secreted by the worker bees within a hive and used to feed all growing larvae for three days. When the hive needs a new queen bee, a larvae is selected and placed within a specially constructed queen cell. These particular cells allow for the larvae to be surrounded with copious amounts of this royal jelly, which feed her during her entire growth period whereas the non fertile worker bees are only fed this jelly in their beginning growth stage.

Feeding a larvae like this signals the development of a queen, which includes the formation of the ovaries needed to lay eggs.

While absent of the ever important fat-soluble vitamins, it remains a good source of B vitamins, protein, small amounts of amino acids and fatty acids, as well trace minerals, some enzymes, and trace amounts of vitamin C.

It’s been shown in some studies to balance hormones and increase egg health.

Royal jelly can be taken in capsule form and is often sold as a mixture with raw honey and bee propolis.

I actually bought a royal jelly complex awhile back. To be honest, I bought this complex just because it was available locally, but along with raw honey and royal jelly it also contains American ginseng, bee pollen (rich in amino acids and studies have shown that it helps increase libido, improves ovarian function, and alleviates PMS), and bee propolis (known to stimulate the immune system and relieve inflammation).

It tastes rather sweet due to the honey, but I was finding it difficult to take regularly. Sometimes I’d put some in a smoothie, other times I’d just take a spoonful, although that was not my favorite way. It tends to have a weird texture and aftertaste when eaten alone.

I just couldn’t seem to remember to take it!

But last night, brilliance hit.

I’ve made raw fudge many different times with honey, why not with royal jelly?

Todd always tells me that I make enough stuff, at some point I’ll get it right………


And fudge is so very right.

This raw fudge recipe is full of the goodness of royal jelly, the richness of cacao, and good fats for your fertility.

Royal Jelly Fudge

Ingredients
4 tablespoons royal jelly complex (or royal jelly and raw honey mix)
4 tablespoons melted coconut oil
3 tablespoons raw cacao powder
2-3 tablespoons peanut or almond butter (optional)

Method of Preparation

1. Combine all ingredients until well mixed.

2. Pour the mixture into a small pan (bread pan works well) or evenly into an ice cube tray.

3. Freeze until solid and cut into 12 even pieces. This way you should be getting about one teaspoon of royal jelly complex in each ‘dose’.

4. Store in the freezer to keep solid.

The directions on my royal jelly complex jar say to take one teaspoon three times per day, but check whatever you buy to make sure.

I’d say that a small piece of fudge a few times per day sounds like a fantastic way to get in a bit of extra nourishment!

 

*I like to include peanut butter or almond butter in mine for some protein as well. This way I’m getting protein along with the fat from coconut oil and the natural sugar from the honey. Seems to me that it would round out the micro-nutrients a bit better this way.

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Oatmeal Banana Cookies {no sugar} {gluten free} {recipe}

There’s nothing like a warm homemade cookie, fresh out of the oven. But years ago, after learning how sugar affects my body, I basically stopped baking. Leaving cookies to very rare occasions like Christmas.

Which, don’t get me wrong, is a very good thing!

But there are also days where I need to bring cookies to church or family functions, or bless my family with a treat. And for those days I now have a go-to recipe that has no sugar, not even honey or maple syrup.

sugar free oatmeal cookie

Oatmeal Banana Cookies

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups rolled oats
1 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 cup of almond meal
1/2 cup almonds, finely chopped
1 cup raisins (or other dried fruit)
3 ripe bananas, mashed
2 eggs
1/4 cup melted coconut oil or butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Method of Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients until well mixed.

3. In another bowl, mix together the mashed bananas, eggs, oil, and vanilla. Stir into the dry mixture.

4. Place approximately 2 Tbsp of the mixture on the cookie sheet for each cookie. I used a round cookie cutter to make them, lightly pressing it into the cutter for each one.

5. Bake for 18-20 minutes, just until they begin to brown.

sugar free oatmeal cookies

I love finding simple recipes like this, and all of the ingredients are pantry staples for me. I also love taking recipes that most people deem as “healthy” and making them “unhealthy” again! This recipe is an adaptation of one I found on Pinterest a couple of weeks ago. The original had no saturated fats or eggs.

So I added them back in.

And no – these aren’t ‘properly soaked’ cookies. I can deal with that since they are void of sugar. These are best when eaten the same day as they were baked. Or at least while warmed back up. I think what I’m going to have to do is  mesh it with my baked oatmeal recipe……

 

Also – if you need to stay on a strict gluten free diet, make sure to buy gluten free oats!

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Almonds {how to soak}

Almonds are one of my favorite quick snacks as well as an easy way to add crunch and flavor to many dishes. A few years ago my thoughts on almonds changed a bit after reading Nourishing Traditions, when I was confronted with the fact that raw or roasted almonds may essentially be robbing our bodies of nutrients. Almonds are one of the foods highest in phytic acid – even more so than wheat, oatmeal, and soy. It is taught in the “traditional foods” circles that this enzyme inhibitor must be removed to aid in digestion and nutrient absorption.

After soaking almonds for the first time I was hooked.

It takes some time, though just a few minutes of active work, but the end result is a nut that not only tastes better, but is easier on the digestive system. I now soak most of the almonds that I use because I notice such a big difference in overall digestion – which to me is more important than scientific studies.

{to read more about the phytic acid content in nuts and seeds, check out Kimi from The Nourishing Gourmet’s research}

Soaking sunflower seeds and almonds and making a gallon of water kefir. What traditional foods are you making today?

Besides snacking on crispy almonds by themselves, I like to use them in:

Almonds {how to soak}
Author: 
Recipe type: Traditional Food Preparation
 
Ingredients
  • Raw Almonds (if you can't find raw, purchase unroasted, unsalted)
Method of Preparation
  1. Use a container at least twice the size of the amount of almonds you’re using. They swell to about twice the size and will soak up much of the water.
  2. Cover the nuts with warm water and let sit in a warm place for about 12 hours or overnight. After about 12 hours, or in the morning, drain the water, add one teaspoon of salt per quart of almonds (presoaked quantity), and fill again with warm water to let soak for another 8-12 hours.
  3. After the final salt water soak, drain the almonds and dehydrate until crisp. This may take awhile…… Use the nut setting on your dehydrator or the lowest temperature available on your oven.
  4. When I first started soaking almonds I finished after dehydrating to keep them raw, but since Kimi posted that both dehydrating AND then roasting removed even more phytic acid (though studies have yet to prove how much) I’ve roasted them in the oven for 20 minutes or so which adds a nice roasted flavor to the already salted nuts.
  5. Even the experts are unsure of how much phytic acid is removed during this process, or even if it removes enough to make it worth while, but what I do know is that I notice a difference between soaked and unsoaked almonds. So I’ll continue soaking them but not freak out should I consume an unsoaked one from time to time.

almonds1

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All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Fertility Tea Blend {recipe}

tea_061111_41

© Donielle

I truly believe that many times the cure for what ails us has already been given by God in the form of plants.

Herbs can be a wonderful addition to a healthy diet to help balance hormones and cleanse the body. Recently I’ve made myself about a quart of tea each day and enjoy drinking it over ice. It’s a fabulously refreshing on our hot and humid days, and I love knowing that it’s nourishing my body as well as hydrating it.

The herbs used can be specific to each woman, adding in others to help with unique health issues, and taking out what’s not needed. But I find that this simple mix offers me what I need for now and I’m not only happy with the changes I see happening, but also with the flavor. There may be other herbs that you enjoy using and the possibilities are endless!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Fertility Tea Blend {recipe}
Author: 
Recipe type: Beverages
 
Ingredients
  • red clover (harvested and dried myself) – for cleansing the blood, supporting the uterus, helps to alkalize the body and has a high mineral content.
  • dandelion root – purifies and builds the blood, helps increase production of bile, cleansing the liver and keeping digestion moving, is rich in potassium, overall benefits the female organs
  • nettle leaves – a blood purifier, increase the efficiency of the liver and kidneys, may help with the imbalance of the body’s mucous membranes. Also known as a uterine tonic and high in minerals.
  • red raspberry leaf – great for the female reproductive organs, strengthens the uterus, helps to decrease a heavy period, also aids in pregnancy support, and high in minerals.
  • rose hips – a good source of vitamin C, offers immune support, and good for stress.
  • Other herbal option would be something like vitex and/or dong quai – both help to normalize the menstrual cycle, but note that dong quai should not be taken alone and should not be taken during pregnancy.
Method of Preparation
  1. Boil 3½ cups of water and add one heaping teaspoon of each herb to either a french press, or jar to strain later. (if you dry your own red clover, add a handful of blossoms)
  2. Pour the boiling water over the herbs and let sit for 3-4 hours, straining into a jar when finished infusing.
  3. Stir in a small amount of honey if needed and a bit of juice from a lemon. Refrigerate and drink throughout the day.
Notes
Optional Tastiness: I also add in the following on occasion (about 1 teaspoon each) to change up the flavor and include other nutrients: red rooibos tea – contains high levels of antioxidants and minerals, boosts the immune system, helps with nervous tension, and soothes digestive problems. elderberry – immune booster and flu fighter, ease inflammation and pain, and soothe the intestines dried cranberries (sugar and sulphur free)- adds wonderful flavor, digestive aid, helps to prevent urinary tract infections, and contains anti-inflammatory properties.

tea1

 

What blends of herbs  do you use for fertility support?

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

How to Make Beef Broth

Making your own broth is one of the most nourishing foods you can make for your family, yet one of the most frugal. Nourishing broth should be a staple in every home and consumed a few times a week.

Science validates what our grandmothers knew. .. Stock contains minerals in a form the body can absorb easily—not just calcium but also magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and trace minerals. It contains the broken down material from cartilage and tendons–stuff like chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, now sold as expensive supplements for arthritis and joint pain.

From “Broth is Beautiful” by Sally Fallon Morell

Homemade broth begins with just a few  simple ingredients; bones, water, and vegetables. In the end you’re left with a nutrient dense, rich tasting broth to be used in a multitude of recipes.

“Good broth will resurrect the dead,” South American proverb.

When you make beef broth, you can easily use marrow bones you find in the supermarket or ask your butcher to save them for you when you buy part of a cow. In fact, ask your local butcher anytime you need them. They should have ample supply or save some for you to pick up later. (and of course, grass fed organic beef bones are going to be the most nutritious and lower in any toxins)

beef bones 2

photo credit – donielle

Usually when I start getting the bones out I also get quite the audience…..

dozer

photo credit – donielle

Beef bones should also be roasted before making broth as it helps to form the best color and flavor.

Roast them until cooked through and starting to brown in a 350 degree oven.

beef bones

photo credit – donielle

Let the bones cool for a bit and add to a pan of cold water, using about three times as much water as bones and adding in a Tbsp or two of apple cider vinegar to pull out the calcium from the bones. After the bones and water have sat for about an hour, heat to boiling and remove any scum that surfaces. Not only do these impurities make the broth look bad, they can also put a damper on the wonderful flavor you’d normally get. After skimming, allow to simmer on low and cover.

With larger bones like those from beef, you should allow it to simmer at least 12-18 hours to fully extract nutrients and flavor. My favorite way to make broth is to allow just the bones to simmer in the water overnight and then add the vegetables in the morning since they don’t need to cook as long. You may toss in whatever vegetables you like, but my basic “recipe” is one whole onion (white or yellow) a few carrots, a few stalks of celery, and 2-3 cloves of garlic. Add in 2 bay leaves and sea salt and pepper to taste while it simmers for another 2-4 hours. When finished, the water level should be just above the level of the bones.

Strain the broth through a fine mesh strainer and refrigerate.

Depending on your usage of the broth you may or may not want to spoon off the fat once it rises to the top when cooled. I prefer to leave the fat in (it won’t hurt you – promise!) when I use the broth for gravies or making rice, but I do spoon it off when I use it for soups. This leaves my soups with a wonderful clear broth and no ‘fatty’ taste.

Keep the fat you spoon off for other uses; like making a rue for gravy and white sauce, or frying meats or potatoes.

A good broth will also “gel” when cold, though an un-gelled broth is plenty tasty and nutritious as well, but may be lacking in the full nutrient density of a broth that gels well.

broth

photo credit – donielle

Chicken broth can be made very much in the same way, though doesn’t need to simmer quite as long since the bones are smaller. You can also read my crockpot method for chicken broth and use it for beef broth as well.

A big stock pot is the best gift a bride can receive.”   Francis Pottenger

 

How to Make Beef Broth
Author: 
Recipe type: Soups and Stews
 
Ingredients
  • Beef bones, approx 2-3 lbs
  • One whole onion
  • Several carrots and stalks of celery
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Salt & pepper
Method of Preparation
  1. Roast the bones until cooked through and starting to brown in a 350 oven.
  2. Let the bones cool for a bit and add to a pan of cold water, using about three times as much water as bones and adding in a Tbsp or two of apple cider vinegar to pull out the calcium from the bones.
  3. After the bones and water have sat for about an hour, heat to boiling and remove any scum that surfaces.
  4. With larger bones like those from beef, you should allow it to simmer at least 12-18 hours to fully extract nutrients and flavor.
  5. You may toss in whatever vegetables you like, but my basic “recipe” is one whole onion (white or yellow) a few carrots, a few stalks of celery, and 2-3 cloves of garlic. Add in 2 bay leaves and sea salt and pepper to taste while it simmers for another 2-4 hours.
  6. When finished, the water level should be just above the level of the bones.
  7. Strain the broth through a fine mesh strainer and refrigerate.
  8. Depending on your usage of the broth you may or may not want to spoon off the fat once it rises to the top when cooled. I prefer to leave the fat in (it won’t hurt you – promise!) when I use the broth for gravies or making rice, but I do spoon it off when I use it for soups. This leaves my soups with a wonderful clear broth and no ‘fatty’ taste.
  9. Keep the fat you spoon off for other uses; like making a rue for gravy and white sauce, or frying meats.

beef broth1

 

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.