Loaded “Baked Potato” Salad {recipe}

I’ve always tried to be a big fan of potato salad, but I just couldn’t do it. It didn’t matter if it was someone’s award winning, or handed down through the generations recipe or purchased from a store. I just wasn’t’ a fan, even though people seemed to rave about it constantly.

I’d put some on my plate when at at potlucks or other such functions, but it was usually because I was hungry and there wasn’t much else on the table that I could eat. Sometimes it ended up not being eaten.

But last year I began a love affair with, literally, the best potato salad I’ve ever had.

You can serve this warm (my favorite), room temp, or cold the bacon won’t be as crunchy if it’s cold) and it’s sure to please every time.

homemade potato salad

Most of the time a good portion of this is eaten before the meal is even served.

It’s so good that even those who may think eating “real” food is silly, and normally pass by your dishes, will devour it and ask for the recipe. It’s quickly become my go-to dish to bring to potlucks and I often make it for showers and open houses. It’s perfect for summer functions, like the Fourth of July next week!

This potato salad is rich and creamy, flavorful, and it includes bacon. What’s not to love?

loaded baked potato salad

The only downfall to this fantastic dish is the marriage of starchy goodness with fatty goodness, it’s not so kind to the waist line! So halve the recipe when making it for a small family, or invite others over to help you enjoy it.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Loaded Potato Salad {recipe}
Author: 
Recipe type: Side Dishes
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
  • 4 large russet potatoes, peeled and chopped into ½ inch pieces
  • ½ cup mayonnaise (The real stuff!)
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • ½ cup shredded, extra sharp cheddar
  • ¼ cup chopped, fresh chives
  • 8-12 strips bacon, cooked and chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
Method of Preparation
  1. Boil potatoes until cooked through, but still slightly firm. You don't want them turning to mush as you stir everything together, but you don't want them crunchy.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the mayo, sour cream, and most of the chives (you can also use onion if you don't have chives) until well mixed.
  3. Add ½ tsp salt (to start) and ¼ tsp pepper.
  4. Chill for 20-30 minutes. This lets the flavor of the chives come out more, but if you forget or don't have time, don't worry about it.
  5. Cook or fry the bacon and let cool slightly, chop when cool enough to handle.
  6. Once the potatoes are "fork tender", drain and let cool to almost room temp.
  7. Gently fold the potatoes and most of the bacon into the dressing mix. Taste to see if it needs more salt.
  8. Garnish with the rest of the chives and bacon.

loaded potato salad recipe

Recipe source – Veronica’s Cornucopia

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Gluten Free Sourdough Bread, artisan style {recipe}

It’s been a bit of time since I posted the gluten-free sourdough starter recipe, and I’ve been promising this sourdough bread recipe for some time now. But life began to happen and I didn’t have the time to test it out over and over as I had wanted to.

But alas, today is the day where I can finally share my gluten-free sourdough recipe!

I’ve tested it a few different times, with multiple different ingredients used as a binder, trying to find the healthiest way to make a tasty loaf of gluten-free bread. I tried egg, guar gum, xanthan gum, and chia seed gel, and the only one that made a nice well-formed loaf was the xanthan gum. So while I don’t like to use it a lot (some people don’t tolerate it all to well, and I don’t think it’s normally found in the same category as “real” or “nutrient dense” foods, but for this bread, it’s needed.

You can check out my experiments at the end of the post!

gluten free sourdough bread

Gluten Free Sourdough Bread, artisan style
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups gluten free sourdough starter
  • 1 cup tapioca flour
  • 1½ cup sorghum
  • 1 cup oat flour (blend oats until they turn to powder)
  • 1 cup millet flour
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • ⅔ cup water
  • ⅓ cup oil or softened butter
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 Tbsp xanthan gum
  • 4 large eggs, lightly whisked
Method of Preparation
  1. In a large bowl, stir together the starter, water, and eggs.
  2. In a separate bowl (I used my stand mixer), mix together all dry ingredients; all of the flours, salt, xanthan gum, and sugar.
  3. Add the oil or butter to the dry ingredients and mix until well blended.
  4. While the mixer is on low, slowly pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. If you do it all at once or to quickly, you may end up with lumpy dough. Pour just slow enough that it can be gradually mixed, but not so slow that it takes you more than a minute or two. If you are mixing by hand, pour it in approximately a cup at a time and mix as you go.
  5. Let the dough sit out in a warm place for at least a few hours, preferably 6-8.
  6. You may then take out approximately ¼ of the dough to bake if you'd like and place the rest in the refrigerator for later use.
  7. When baking, gently place the dough on parchment paper if you have any (I don't and it worked fine) on a flat surface. You want to be careful not to disturb the dough to much so that it keeps the air bubbles intact from the sourdough action. Use wet hands to smooth it out if you'd like, and let it rest for 4-8 hours.
  8. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees with a cast iron dutch oven. You can also use a 1½ quart Corningware casserole dish with glass lid. I used the latter (like this one) since I don't have the dutch oven and it works just fine.
  9. Once preheated, very gently slice the top of the loaf a few times with a serrated knife and place into the preheated pan.
  10. Bake for 15 minutes.
  11. Take off the cover and reduce heat to 450 degrees and bake for another 20 minutes.
  12. Let the bread cool completely before slicing.

gfbread_pin

This bread is great warmed or toasted with a slab of butter, dipped into herb infused oils, or spread with homemade jam.

For one of my experiments, I tried out four different “binders”;

  1. egg,
  2. egg and chia,
  3. chia, and
  4. egg and xanthan gum.

gluten free sourdough 1. egg

I omitted the xanthan gum for this test. This dough was very wet and I had to add an additional 1/2 cup of rice flour to get it to the right consistency for gluten-free bread. The loaf also fell completely flat and the chickens got to eat it as we only ate enough to test it out.

As a muffin, this was Todd’s favorite.

gfbread_test2

2. egg and chia

I omitted the xanthan gum from the recipe and instead used 1/2 cup chia seed gel. This dough was again very wet and needed and additional 1/2 cup of rice flour and it fell completely flat.

As a muffin, this was my favorite.

gfbread_test3

3. chia seed gel

For this loaf I omitted both the egg and the xanthan gum, using 1/2 cup chia seed gel in the recipe and cut out both the egg and xantahn gum. I was really hoping that it would work better than it did as I currently know a lot of families that can not have eggs. The loaf was not good at all and hard to handle (with a spoon), though the muffin was decent even though it didn’t rise as much as the first two.

gfbread_test4

4. egg and xanthan gum

This was the recipe for the loaf posted above and made a great loaf. As a muffin it seemed a bit dense.

I’ve also tried guar gum in place of xanthan gum and it resulted in a dismal failure for a loaf as well as my pizza crust. I don’t recommend it!

Have you ever tried a gluten-free sourdough recipe? Tell me about it!

 

The recipe is adapted from the Gluten-Free Crusty Boule from Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes.

The chia seed gel idea came from the GNOWFGLINS sourdough ebook.

Black Bean Soup with Shredded Pork {recipe}

The first day of spring is tomorrow. The day when the birds begin to wake us every morning with their song, the flowers begin to push through the soil, grass begins to green, and we get to go outside without bundling up under layers.

Oh, right. I live in Michigan.

snow

We never quite know when spring will make its appearance, last year was unseasonably warm (think 80’s) and this year we’re under a layer of snow. So it’s probably safe to say that it’ll be soup weather for some time.

Good thing we love soup at our house, it’s oh so warming and nourishing. And this one also gives our family a break from the usual chicken soup.

black bean and pork soup

Black Bean Soup with Shredded Pork {recipe}
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound dried black beans (or 3 cups cooked beans)
  • 2 bone-in center-cut pork chops
  • 4-6 slices of bacon
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2-4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp canned chipotle chilies in adobo sauce, chopped. (this is about the only canned item I ever buy as I can not find a similar taste elsewhere)
  • 2 cups diced tomatoes (or one can)
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • 1 red or yellow pepper, diced
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 6 cups of water
Method of Preparation
  1. Soak beans overnight for best nutrient absorption.
  2. Melt the butter (or oil) in a 6 quart pot and saute onions and peppers until soft.
  3. Add all the ingredients, except the bacon, and allow to simmer on low for about two hours. (This can also be done in the crockpot on low for about 5 hours.)
  4. When the beans are soft and the pork is falling apart so that you can shred it, fry up the bacon and stir in.
  5. Remove the bones, shred the pork, and allow to simmer for 10-15 minutes.
  6. Top with tomato and/or green onion.
Notes
This soup is also tasty served over basmati rice.

 

porksoup_01_011012_pin

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Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

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Gluten-Free Sourdough Pancakes {recipe}

Simple sourdough pancakes, paired with some lovely pastured sausage or bacon and fruit is one of our favorite breakfasts. most often enjoyed on a Saturday morning. The slight tang of the sourdough offers a perfect balance with real maple syrup and rich grass-fed butter. Sometimes we even top them with fresh whipped cream for a gourmet feel.

Have you started your own gluten-free sourdough starter yet?

I began my gluten-free sourdough starter over a month ago love watching it bubble away on the counter. It also means that our pancakes breakfast is quick and easy in the morning with just a few minutes of preparation the night before.And I love knowing that the food I serve my family will be easier to digest, allowing us to absorb more nutrients from it.

The recipe we’ve been using is based on the whole wheat sourdough pancakes I’ve made in the past, just updated to work within our family’s dietary needs.

gluten free sourdough pancakes

Gluten-Free Sourdough Pancakes {recipe}
Author: 
Recipe type: Breads and Grains
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup brown rice sourdough starter
  • 1 cup gluten free flour mix (I use ½ cup oat flour and ½ cup millet flour. You can also use sorghum or teff, just stick to whole grain flour)
  • ⅔ cup water
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup (or equivalent sweetener)
  • 1 lightly beaten egg
  • 3 Tbsp coconut oil (or melted butter)
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp psyllium fiber or xanthan gum
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 Tbsp water
Method of Preparation
  1. The night before: mix the starter with 1 cup of GF flour mix and ⅔ water. Leave it in a warm place overnight to continue the sourdough process. You could also use only starter, as I did with my whole wheat pancakes, but I find that using only brown rice makes the pancakes a bit crumbly.
  2. In the morning add the sweetener, egg, oil or butter, sea salt, and either fiber or xanthan gum.
  3. Dissolve the baking soda in the water and then gently fold into the batter.
  4. Place about ¼ cup of the batter onto a medium-hot skillet and flip when the bubbles in the batter stay open. Cook the second side until done.
  5. Serve with a quality grass-fed butter, nut or seed butter, and/or maple syrup.

This recipe can easily be doubled and they store well in the refrigerator for a few days.

gluten free sourdough pancakes

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All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Benefits of Sourdough Bread and How to Make a Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

Fermented foods, of which our diets are severely lacking, have the ability to make food easier to digest as well as provide our bodies with needed nutrients and beneficial bacteria. Sourdough is one of those fermented foods.

It’s been a few years since I’ve taken the time to experiment with sourdough breads, it always seems so tricky and I got tired of baking bricks. I was able to make a few good loaves, but never with consistency. The one sourdough food we really loved though were pancakes. So easy to make and deliciously light.

We then went gluten-free and gave up bread for the most part, making only a loaf of yeasted bread every few months.

As we discussed yesterday in our post about digestion, preparing foods properly is really important. It helps our bodies absorb more nutrients and it is easier on the gut, causing less issues. One of the ways to properly ferment grains (breads) is to use a sourdough method.

This method has been used for centuries; our great-grandmothers worked in their kitchens making this traditional bread, their cupboards held a jar of the starter. Instant yeast was not easily accessible if available at all, so sourdough was the only way you could get a bread to rise.

“Sourdough breads are leavened by a starter that contain natural yeasts and acids. The airborne yeast creates the enzymes needed to eat up or predigest some of the toughest-on-your-belly parts of the grain. This action creates carbon dioxide, which gets trapped in tiny pockets of dough, resulting in a natural rising of the bread.” –Shannon

Preparing breads using a sourdough method is also known to break down the gluten when using a wheat flour, lowers the starch content of the grain as the bacteria present consume the sugars and starch, and it also nutralizes an enzyme within the grain called phytic-acid.

Through the process of lactic acid fermentation is also activates the phytase to hydrolyze (dissolve) the phytates, thus freeing up minerals such as: zinc, iron, magnesium, copper, and phosphorus. (source: Katie Kimball)

All in all, sourdough breads are much easier for the body to digest and as an added benefit, the bacteria also add nutrients into it as well.

In my goal to make 2013 the year of the ferments in our home, I’m beginning to experiment again, and we currently have a nice little gluten-free sourdough starter happily fermenting away on the counter.

gluten free sourdough

How to Make a Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

5.0 from 1 reviews
How to Make a Gluten Free Starter
Author: 
Recipe type: Breads and Grains
 
Ingredients
  • 4 cups brown rice flour
  • 3 cups filtered/non-chlorinated water
  • optional - 2 tbsp water kefir
Method of Preparation
  1. It's important to have water free from chemicals, specifically chlorine as it may damage the starter. If you have city water (versus your own well) you can place a jar or bowl of water, uncovered, out on the counter overnight. You can also boil the water for ten minutes and let cool to room temp.
  2. Day one - four you are going to place ¼ cup of flour and a scant ¼ cup of water into a jar and stir with a wooden (or plastic) spoon every morning and every night. I find that when making a starter, it's helpful to feed it twice a day for the first few days. Cover your starter with a thin towel or cloth jar cover. (I've also used coffee filters and rubberbands which work well)
  3. If your starter doesn't seem every active, you can "boost" it a bit by adding a tablespoon of water kefir.
  4. By day five your starter should be bubbling along and able to sustain just one feeding per day, so each day you add ½ cup of brown rice flour and ⅓ cup of water. The consistency we're looking for is going to be like cake batter, so add more or less water based on how yours looks.
  5. At day seven you should have enough starter to make your first sourdough recipe! If you're not looking to use it immediately,place it in a mason jar with a solid cover and refrigerate, feeding once a week or so to keep it active.
Notes
It is important to keep your starter in a warm place; if it gets to cold it won't be active enough to work. I find that keeping mine in the oven with the pilot light on can help immensely during the cold winter months. Others find that they can place it next to the stove or on top of a refrigerator for warmth.

 

If you are not completely gluten-free, you can also add a few tablespoons of whole wheat flour (I’d recommend spelt or einkorn flour) as it can help boost the health of your starter. You can also make a whole wheat sourdough starter.

gluten free sourdough

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.