Symptoms of Thyroid Disorder

natural treatment for thyroid disordersThyroid disorders seem to be on the rise in modern civilization, but why? And how do we know if it’s something we deal with?

As many of you know, I’ve been basically feeling like crud for the last year. I’ve very much had feeling of depression and anxiety along with major fatigue and insomnia. I also think it’s probably something that’s been lingering for many, many years, yet only showed up in full force after my miscarriage.

I now am a believer that stress can cause or multiply health issues.

I’ve always dealt with many of the symptoms, but they’ve never interfered with my life before. Or they came and went within weeks/months. When I switched to a whole foods diet most, if not all of them, went away. But then I got too busy for my own good and had to have the help of a chiropractor friend to help pull me out of adrenal fatigue, and felt well afterwards.

But this last year has been a bugger of a year, as symptoms of a thyroid disorder showed up more and more. As a mom of young children, I shrugged off the fatigue. I mean, all moms are tired right? And the feelings of depression and anxiety could be related to the miscarriage and grief. Yet deep down I knew there was something else wrong.

My much awaited lab results showed me just that. And I have a feeling that many of you may also deal with thyroid issues and just don’t know it. Or maybe you’ve been tested and your doctor told you that everything was “normal”. Even when you feel that it’s not.

Thyroid Basics

We will just discuss the very basics of thyroid function, as to cover it all, we’d need to write a book!

The thyroid is a small endocrine gland, just above the adam’s apple in the throat, consisting of two parts. To me it sort of looks like a butterfly. An ugly one. This gland takes in iodine and produces thyroid hormones. Every cell in the body depends upon thyroid hormones for regulation of their own metabolism. It detects shifts in body chemistry (chronic blood sugar imbalance, hormone imbalances, chronic inflammation, nutritional deficiencies, toxicity, liver congestion, poor digestive health, or even the use of hormones, synthetic or bio-identical) and helps the body compensate for them.

But the thyroid does not act alone. As with everything in holistic health, we must also look at how it functions along with other parts of our body. According to Datis Kharrazian in his book “Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms?“:

  1. The hypothalamus sends thyroid releasing hormone (TRH) to the pituitary. (this is basically the thermostat regulator in the body)
  2. The pituitary gland releases thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to the thyroid gland, giving it the signal to produce more hormones.
  3. TSH stimulates thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity to use iodine to create T4 and T3 hormones. 93% of the thyroid hormone production is T4, an inactive form which needs to be converted by different organs in the body. 7% is the usable T3. These hormones hitch a ride in the bloodstream on thyroid-binding proteins to the cells that need them and can convert the T4 to T3.
  4. 60% of the T4 produced by the thyroid is converted to T3 in the liver by an enzyme called tetraidothyronine 5’deiodinase. Another 20% of the T4 is converted in the digestive system via the sulfatase enzyme which is present in healthy guts.

Common Symptoms of HYPOthyroid (under active thyroid)

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Low basal body temps and/or low temperatures throughout the day
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Morning headaches that go away throughout the day
  • Infertility
  • Fatigue
  • Cloudy thinking
  • Weight gain or inability to lose weight easily
  • Sensitive to cold weather
  • Constipation
  • Digestive problems
  • Poor circulation
  • Slow wound healing
  • Need excessive amounts of sleep
  • Gets sick often (colds or viral infections)
  • Itchy and dry skin
  • Dry hair that breaks often, or thinning hair
  • Thinning of the outermost part of the eyebrow
  • High cholesterol

What happens in the body when you have hypothyroidism

There are actually different ways that hypothyroid happens in the body. Sometimes it’s because the pituitary senses the thyroid isn’t doing it’s job correctly and produces more thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Other times the pituitary is fatigued and not able to produce the TSH to signal the thyroid how many hormones to produce. Another pattern of hypothyroid is the inability of the body to convert T4 to T3 because of excess cortisol or chronic inflammation.

Some women with high levels of testosterone may also find that too much T4 is converted to T3, causing the cells of the body to become resistant to the hormone and not allowing it entry to do its work. (most often found in those with insulin resistance and PCOS- per “Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms?“)

Symptoms of HYPERthyroid (overactive thyroid)

  • heart palpitations
  • heat intolerance
  • nervousness
  • fast heart rate
  • hair loss
  • muscle weakness

What happens in the body when you have hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is a medical term that basically means your thyroid is producing to many hormones so you have to many thyroid hormones for the cells. This could be due to the thyroid getting the signal to produce too much, or the inability of the cells to absorb the thyroid hormone.

The following may also indicate Hashimotos, an autoimmune thyroid disorder:

  • heart palpitations
  • inward trembling
  • increased pulse rate, even at rest
  • feelings of nervousness and emotional distress
  • night sweats
  • difficulty gaining weight
  • people with Hashimoto’s also tend to go back and forth between the symptoms of hypo and hyper thyroid.

What happens in the body when you have Hashimoto’s

This is an autoimmune disease where your immune system is actively attacking your thyroid, destroying it. It is also the most common cause of hypothyroidism, some sources stating that up to 90% of hypothyroid cases are due to Hashimoto’s. This causes the thyroid to continue to lose function, eventually not working at all. It can cause hypothyroid symptoms  and then can change to hyperthyroid symptoms as a “flare-up” destroys the thyroid tissue and hormones stored in the gland flow into the bloodstream. Once these hormones get into the bloodstream, the body’s metabolism speeds up, and a person will experience the symptoms of hyperthyroidism.

The good news

You don’t have to live your life feeling like junk; depressed, anxious, overwhelmed, and overweight. There is hope for fixing thyroid issues without lifelong medications, and in the following days/weeks, we’ll be talking about ways to heal the body and focus on supporting your thyroid.

Have you had your thyroid checked? Your homework for the next couple of days is to call your doctor and get your test results. I cannot stress this enough! You need to find out your numbers and have them tell you exactly what thyroid hormones were tested and what ranges they used to decide what “normal” function is.

We’ll continue this conversation!

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Autoimmune, the cause and the cure {a book review}

autoimmune and infertility

I received the book “Autoimmune, the Cause and the Cure” by Annese Brockley and Kristin Urdiales early last fall and began reading the first chapter or two. I figured it’d be a good read, and I’d pack away the information for later use.

But I never did really get in to it.

And I’m so glad I didn’t finish it at the time! Which sounds odd, I know. But had I read the book then I may have forgotten some very important information.

(side note – if you haven’t heard yet, I recently got some blood work done to figure out why I’ve felt so crummy)

Over the holidays, I requested a few books from the library, and settled down with this one as I waited for the other books I thought would help me sort out my labs and deficiencies.

And it was like the sky opened up and a sunbeam fell straight on to the pages.

Throughout the book they talk about both vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiencies as well as problems surrounding thyroid hormones. And what I found was that I have a lot of work to do with my body to get it to absorb nutrients correctly!

“Vitamin B12 is often called the energy vitamin because it helps fat and protein to metabolize in your body. It also plays a major role in the conversion of carbohydrates to glucose- your body’s source of fuel. In addition, B12 enables your body to convert fatty acids into energy. It is also a promoter of normal immune function.

If the enzymes necessary to release B12 from protein are not available, then no matter how much protein -bound B12 we consume, we will continue to have a deficiency of B12. (the study that follows this paragraph on page 17 of the book concludes that absorption of vitamin B12 is dependent on the presence of appropriate pancreatic enzymes)

So yea, me. The girl who didn’t think she had gut issues or absorption issues because my digestion is always awesome…..has gut issues. And I was able to find out all about functional ranges for my deficiencies, not just the ranges that mean we’re not severely diseased.

Now, the major point of this book is that you CAN heal your body and correct some of the damage done by an autoimmune disorder. They make a very strong case about the cause of these disorders, often referring to studies for Hashimotos, Fibromyalgia, Lupus, and Multiple Sclerosis. It makes me want to tell everyone I know!

I even learned that having low B12 causes high homocysteine levels, which cause arterial damage, that then causes the body to send cholesterol to the damaged arteries. (which may cause clots) So if you have high cholesterol, checking for nutrient deficiencies like B12 would be a good idea.

There are also multiple references to both poly cystic ovary syndrome and endometriosis.

So instead of me just writing this review to a specific type of person, one with an autoimmune disease, I want to tell you all that this book is extremely helpful for just about every health issue!

“It would make sense that as the body becomes more depleted of vitamin B12, enzymes, and essential amino acids, you would see increasingly severe and varying symptoms.” – page 125

I’m so glad I figured out the cause of my health issues before they became worse, or would have been harder to correct.

“Women are more prone to develop auto-immune disease. Pregnancy and childbirth could be one reason why. During pregnancy, extra red blood cells are needed for you and your developing fetus. More vitamin B12 is required for pregnant women because it aids in the forming of red blood cells.” – page 125″

“In a recent study from Denmark, researchers found that in the first year after a conventional deliveries or cesarean sections, women had a 15 or 30 percent greater risk, respectively, of contracting autoimmune diseases such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.” – page 126

I would also have to think that a pregnancy loss would also have somewhat of the same effect.

The first two-thirds of the book cover the science behind “the cause”, offering abstracts of the studies that back up the theory. I did end up skipping reading many of the studies as they also give conclusions to most of them. It was great that they were in there, so I could read them myself if I had wanted to though.

The last part of the book was about “the cure”, or how to reverse deficiencies and build the gut so the body stops attacking itself. it’s full of great information and some simple recipes, all based on a traditional, whole foods diet.

I highly recommend this book to anyone researching their health issues, and especially to those who have a known autoimmune disease. Because there is hope to living a more quality life!

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Gluten Free Bread {recipe}

I don’t often miss bread anymore after our family has been gluten-free for almost two years. When asked by someone contemplating a gluten-free diet how we do meals without bread……well, we just do!

But at first it seemed agonizing.

We had pancakes or muffins for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch, and rolls with dinner.

I had mastered my homemade whole wheat bread, the smell of it wafting through the house, calling us to the kitchen with its intoxicating aroma.

But when Todd had to go gluten-free, we all went gluten-free. Since it’s not a necessary food for survival, we could all stand to do without. Plus we had been having some health issues with our kids as well and decided that it would be best for them to go without it for a time. (and while I remain 98% gluten-free, the rest of my family is still completely gluten-free)

Meals were tough at first, learning how to replace wheat with other flours in recipes seemed mind-boggling. And for the most part, we just go without breads now, save for some whole grain pancakes on the weekend. I just found that while eating gluten-free – replacing our normal foods with gluten-free options also meant that we were eating more refined flours than we had for a few years. So we added in more vegetables and some whole grain dishes made with rice or millet instead of the bread and rolls.

Every once in a while though, maybe once a month, I make a loaf of gluten-free bread. It’s not a health food per se (because of the ‘white’ flours/starches), but a great substitute for a light and moist loaf of bread. A facebook friend of mine gave me the recipe a few months back and we’ve enjoyed it ever since.

It’s not as pretty as a loaf made with whole wheat, but it sure is tasty!

gluten free bread recipe

Gluten Free Bread

(makes 2 loaves)

Ingredients

3.5 cups brown rice flour
2.5 cups potato or tapioca starch (you could also use arrowroot flour)
2 tsp baking powder
2 tsp xanthan gum
5 Tbsp whole cane sugar, divided
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup softened butter or lard
2 cups warm water, divided
1/2 cup whole milk
2 Tbsp yeast
4 eggs, pastured preferred
1 tsp apple cider vinegar

Method of Preparation

1.Place the yeast in 1/2 cup warm water-1/2 cup milk along with 1 tablespoon sugar. Let stand for about ten minutes. (I use hot water and cold milk – hot+cold=warm)

2. In a stand mixer (or use your muscles) mix together the brown rice flour, tapioca starch, baking powder, xanthan gum, 4 tablespoons of the sugar, and the salt together until well combined.

3. Mix together the yeast mixture, the softened butter (not melted!), the eggs, and the apple cider vinegar.

4. Add the additional warm water while mixing to get the right consistency. We’re looking for something like cake batter. It will be spoon-able, not knead-able like wheat breads.

5. Spread into two greased bread pans, about half full. One option I use regularly is to make a loaf of bread, a pizza crust, and use any leftover for breadsticks.

6. Let sit in a warm area for 20-40 minutes. Keep and eye on it as you don’t want the bread in the pan to get to high as it will bake over the sides and fall to the bottom of the oven. I like to run my stove on just enough to warm it, turn it off, and then place the pans inside for the bread to rise.

7. Bake at 350 degrees for about 25 minutes, or until 190 degrees in the center.

8. Let cool and remove from pans. Best eaten the same day or seal in airtight container and keep on the counter for another day or two. (refrigerating seems to make it dry out faster) After that you can chop it up to make bread crumbs or croutons!

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Diet Investigation: Gluten Free

We’ve talked a lot about going gluten-free (check the links at the bottom), and I know many of my readers are gluten-free, as is my family. But there is also this thinking out there that it’s some type of “fad” diet, or that people only do it to try to lose weight, or that it’s because their favorite celebrity is doing it.gluten free diet

It’s in the news so much it does cause people to wonder. I mean…..the low-fat diet was in the news all the time, then low-carb. How do we really know that going gluten-free is the right thing for our bodies? How do we know that food manufacturers, who are now making gluten-free foods, have our best interests at heart? Does cousin Sally’s, dentist’s, aunt really know what she’s talking about when she recommends to go gluten-free?

And why is gluten so bad anyways?

The basics of a gluten-free diet are this:

  • You cut out every tiny portion of wheat, rye, spelt, barley, and any other grain containing gluten.
  • Some people even have to go as far as cutting out foods that have been processed near wheat and gluten.
  • Beauty products may need to be changed as some contain gluten.
  • Your life is now over since you can not eat bread.

Alright, so the last one is a stretch, though many people feel this way when they are told they have to go gluten-free.

The thing is, for some people, cutting out gluten can save their life. There are no if, ands, or butts about it.

Gluten is a protein found in wheat (even in the white flour) that gets through the gut lining. It destroys the villi in the intestines and in classic celiac, it causes obscene amounts of intestinal issues among other things. In “silent” celiac, the digestive system may remain mostly normal while the gluten permeates the gut lining and begins attaching to other parts of the body. The body’s immune system then goes on defense attacking the gluten as the foreign invader it is. The problem is, the body also attacks the organs where this protein sets up camp. It also begins attacking the body’s own proteins that are similar to gluten in structure. One of these is the thyroid.

Other signs of silent celiac (organs that the body is damaging – also known as auto-immune) can include arthritis, nerve problems and disease of the nerves, type one diabetes, infertility, multiple miscarriage, and lupus. Even mental illness has a strong link to gluten.

There are many, many people out there that shouldn’t be eating gluten and they are. Some even have been told by their doctors that they don’t need to go gluten-free because tests show that they are only “borderline celiac”.

So how do you know if you have to go gluten-free? Should you even go gluten-free if you don’t think your intolerant to it?

Because undiagnosed gluten intolerance and celiac are so rampant, and the fact that it has such close ties to infertility and multiple miscarriage, I do recommend that people should at least go gluten-free for a month to see how their body reacts. Testing would be so much easier, but unfortunately there really aren’t any tests that are 100% accurate until the gluten has completely damaged the villi. A one month test, staying away from gluten of any kind, is long enough to see if you have reactions as you abstain from eating it (many people get headaches and body aches). After one month you’ll also be able to tell if you physically feel better – some people have been in a “gluten fog” for so long that they don’t even remember what feeling good feels like!

After a month, you eat gluten for one day. If you get sick, get a headache, have intestinal distress, etc – you’re sensitive to gluten. Or if you’re symptoms go away during the month and begin to come back as you add gluten in your diet again – you’re sensitive to gluten.

 

The Pros of Gluten Free Diet:

  • You are cutting out the one ingredient that could be causing a host of your health issues.
  • It also helps people get out of the rut of “bread for each meal”. You can expand your use of other grains (rice, oats, etc) and try many new versions of foods. I love this about being gluten-free! There are so many foods my family eats now, all because we had to give up our “crutch”.

 

The Cons to a Gluten Free Diet:

  • Like I mentioned before, food manufacturers want in on the latest and greatest thing. People see “gluten-free” on a box and they grab it thinking that it must be healthy. Right? Not so. The processed foods are often very high in sugar and white starches, along with other additives to try to give it the texture of wheat.
  • It can also be a bit more expensive when you first transition. While you don’t need to buy the pricier gluten-free flours, it is nice to have on hand sometimes for a family treat.
  • It’s also very overwhelming! Having to read every label and figure out what food is naturally gluten-free and which ones you need replacements for is enough to make anyone run and hide.

gluten free diet

My Thoughts

Eating a gluten-free diet (as long as you stay away from the mass amounts of processed gluten-free foods) is a diet that everyone can follow, but not everyone has to. It’s not a fad diet. But it is also not a diet that’s going to change your health for the worse.

At some point, I also think everyone owes it to themselves to figure out, by method of elimination diet, how their own body reacts to gluten and wheat. Especially people with relatives that suffer from auto-immune diseases (there is a much stronger link if you have a family member with auto-immune issues). If you find you have a sensitivity to it, cut it out of your diet completely.

Our family is currently gluten-free, due to my husband’s gluten intolerance (which we found through an elimination diet). I don’t seem to have any problem with it as I’ve gone months and months without any. I’ve eaten a few times over the last two years and it never seems to have an adverse affect. I’m actually looking at buying some sprouted spelt flour (no reason to sprout and grind my own – I have no grinder and it wouldn’t be cost-effective for me to buy one) to make sourdough bread once or twice a month for those of us in the family that can eat it.

 

Other posts in this series:

Diet Investigation: Standard American Diet

Diet Investigation: Nourishing Traditions Type Diet

Diet Investigation: Vegetarian Diet

Diet Investigation: Primal/Paleo Diet

Diet Investigation: Gluten Free

 

You can also check out all the posts from the week we focused on wheat and gluten:

The Silent Cause to Poor Health – a podcast with Dr. Tom O’Bryan – an expert on gluten and infertility (awesome listen!!)

The Transition to Gluten Free – a guest post by Kat from SCDKat.com

Gluten Free Easily – a guest post from Shirley of GFE

Gluten Free Beauty – a guest post by Kristen of Gluten Free Beauty

Gluten, Grains, and Children with Developmental Issues – guest post by Cara or Health, Home, Happiness

and the 4 part Gluten Free Panel: part one, part two, part three, part four (a Q and A with other people who eat gluten-free)

 

This post is linked to : Real Food Wednesday

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.

Diet Investigation: Primal/Paleo

Since last week Peggy shared her story about healing PCOS (among other maladies) with a primal/paleo diet, I thought I’d pick up the diet investigation series we began last month and dissect this particular diet a bit.

Primal Diet bacon

photo credit: shawnzam

I read The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson last summer and follow a number of “primal” bloggers. As a family we also went completely grain free and mostly primal for 3 months last fall. So I guess I can say I have a fair knowledge of what’s accepted in the diet and what’s not, but I’m going to be writing this based on what I remember and not research it to death. I just plain ‘ol don’t have time for that nonsense right now!

The basics of the primal diet are this:

  • No grains in any way, shape, or form. No bread, no rice, no cereal, no muffins.
  • No legumes: beans, lentils
  • Very low in starchy root vegetables
  • A small amount of nuts and fruit allowed
  • Meat and veggies seem to make the base of this food pyramid
  • More restricted versions have no dairy

The thought process behind this is that our ancestors that lived a million years ago (bear with me) were hunter/gatherer types and had plenty of energy, and slim/fit figures. They didn’t suffer the maladies of our modern lifestyle. They ate what they could find while walking around and hunted the meat they needed. These cavemen didn’t farm at all and they didn’t raise animals.

The Pros of the Primal Diet:

  1. It’s void of all modern and processed food, leaving us with fresher foods that provide much more nutrition.
  2. Sugar is consumed only in a natural form, mostly fruit, and limited at that
  3. Consumption of vegetables is high, making up the carbohydrates that one would eat.
  4. Organic and pesticide meats and produce are strongly recommended which lowers our toxic body burden.
  5. Only good fats like coconut oil and butter are allowed, keeping the diet free of any transfats and scary vegetable oils.
  6. Better health and lowered insulin resistance.

The Cons to the Primal Diet:

I have asked some of the ‘big-wig’ primal/paleo bloggers some questions regarding this diet, the problems I found while following the diet, and still have yet to get them answered. So the following are a few reasons that I personally have with following the diet 100%.

  1. Not everyone experiences weight loss! Most stories of healing with the primal diet also tell of significant weight loss. I was primal (still including some dairy) for 3 months last fall and more strictly paleo (no dairy) for a month this spring. I lost not one pound last fall and 2 pounds this spring. I think the people who lose weight, more often than not, are coming from a modern diet and not a whole foods diet.
  2. The earth is not a million years old and I was never an ape. So this one is personal and religious for me, but I don’t believe in evolution and I don’t believe the earth was created by accident. :-) I do believe we ate differently back in Genesis, but due to the fall of man, our dietary needs and habits changed. Then the flood changed things. And as we’ve begun civilizations in different areas of the world, our dietary needs have also had to change to compensate them.
  3. The biggest thing I have yet to have someone actually tackle and answer for me is this: living in Michigan HOW am I supposed to remain “primal” the entire year? I mean, summer is easy when produce is plentiful – but if we relied on the “hunter-gatherer” method for meat, only fish and small game like wild turkey is huntable then. In the fall, starchy root veggies are ripe and more easily preserved for winter than say….lettuce or cucumbers. And toward the beginning of winter large game also becomes available. Speaking of winter…….where I am supposed to find all of this produce I’m supposed to eat? The NT folks would recommend lacto-fermenting or drying everything – but if we’re looking at the primal diet, it doesn’t seem like they would be preserving much. Right? I could store nuts – but the primal diet is supposed to be low in nuts, not consisting entirely of it. I was thinking about this thought last March; we had just had our first thaw and it was still about 30 degrees. The growing season not to start for another 2 months. If I was only a hunter-gatherer the only things in our woods to eat would be: dead grass, tree bark, maybe some gross nuts from under 3 months of constant snow, and scrawny animals.

Everything is dormant and dead. And I’m hungry.

So I beg of you – if you are a primal blogger, please tell me how this is done without resorting to buying produce from California.

4. The other problem with this diet is the cost. Like most whole food diets, you’ll be spending more on organic and grassfed food products, but with the primal diet you won’t be using the more inexpensive fillers like beans, potatoes, rice, and breads. When we’ve gone completely primal, my grocery budget went from $300.00 to at least $400.00. And that was been I was being pretty stingy and buying less than desired meats so that we could stay away from grains. Going full force primal/organic/grassfed increased our budget to over $500.00 a month for our 2 adults and 2 small children.

 We’re not finished with this whole diet investigation and my thoughts on each (have one you want my thoughts on?) so I won’t go into my final personal thoughts, but the primal diet is fabulous for some people. We went to this diet to help some of our families overcome some medical issues they were beginning to see – and it worked. But we’re not long time “paleo” people either.

 

Other posts in this series:

Diet Investigation: Standard American Diet

Diet Investigation: Nourishing Traditions Type Diet

Diet Investigation: Vegetarian Diet

Diet Investigation: Primal/Paleo Diet

Diet Investigation: Gluten Free

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out this month\'s sponsor, Natural Fertility Shop. They are 100% focused on helping you during your journey towards parenthood and have expert staff and knowledgeable customer service here to help you every step of the way.

All images and content are protected under US copyright laws, please do not copy and paste.

Links in the post above may be affiliate or referral links - meaning that through a sale I may be given monetary benefit. I blog with integrity and only endorse companies and products I love.

I am not a doctor and don\'t pretend to be one. Use everything you read only to inspire you to do your own research and be an advocate for your own health. Please read my disclaimer in full.